Dry stacked block column

Almost everything that needs to be said about concrete, cement, hand-mixing, uses and prices has been said on this forum. Please check out the contributions before posting new questions.

Moderators: Sometimewoodworker, MGV12, BKKBILL, pattayapope

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby spg » Fri Oct 14, 2016 4:03 am

Image
spg
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat May 21, 2016 1:44 am

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Oct 14, 2016 12:07 pm

Now I used google to put in the remarks you highlighted with quotes: http://docplayer.net/1110540-Section-4- ... esign.html and low and behold they are not talking about Thailand, Borneo, Samatra at all but Russia.
Please tell me where Russia is in or near the equator.
You claimed you weighed the blocks? In Russia? Or Samatra? What was the size of the block and the mean weight of say 5?
Your photo shows AAC blocks on the left but the ones on the right are not AAC blocks at all. Or if they are they look nothing like real AAC blocks and you used too much glue.
What all this has to do with "Dry stacked block column" which is the topic, eludes me.
I won't bother with the rest of the gumf, because it appears you are using Google to justify your ends to meet your means.
User avatar
Roger Ramjet
 
Posts: 5250
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 12:55 pm

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Fri Oct 14, 2016 1:24 pm

Roger Ramjet wrote:Now I used google to put in the remarks you highlighted with quotes: http://docplayer.net/1110540-Section-4- ... esign.html and low and behold they are not talking about Thailand, Borneo, Samatra at all but Russia.
Please tell me where Russia is in or near the equator.
You claimed you weighed the blocks? In Russia? Or Samatra? What was the size of the block and the mean weight of say 5?
Your photo shows AAC blocks on the left but the ones on the right are not AAC blocks at all. Or if they are they look nothing like real AAC blocks and you used too much glue.
What all this has to do with "Dry stacked block column" which is the topic, eludes me.
I won't bother with the rest of the gumf, because it appears you are using Google to justify your ends to meet your means.

And you may have noticed that "spg" conveniently forgot to point out that AAC blocks do not absorb water very well at all. Throwing more doubt the claims made
image.png
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1799
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby spg » Fri Oct 14, 2016 3:40 pm

Roger Ramjet wrote:Now I used google to put in the remarks you highlighted with quotes: http://docplayer.net/1110540-Section-4- ... esign.html and low and behold they are not talking about Thailand, Borneo, Samatra at all but Russia.
Please tell me where Russia is in or near the equator.
You claimed you weighed the blocks? In Russia?


Where do you see Russia?

The URL is here: http://www.hebel-usa.com/en/docs/Sectio ... gn_Web.pdf

I'm not really sure why you think the laws of physics or the manufacturing process would be different in Russia, USA or Sumatra.

Or Samatra? What was the size of the block and the mean weight of say 5?


60x20x10 Weight was around 9kg, sorry I didn't keep precise records.

Your photo shows AAC blocks on the left but the ones on the right are not AAC blocks at all. Or if they are they look nothing like real AAC blocks and you used too much glue.


The blocks are AAC for sure. I don't know if they are the best AAC in the world, but they are at least 'grade 2', in terms of what is available here (where Grade 1 is Hebel, Grade 2 is a leading brand from Java, preferred by giant mall constructions, and Grade 3 is made in a local Sumatran factory and presumably inferior in some way).

This was early June, the blocks are just under/left of where the man is sitting on top of the wall.

Image
spg
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat May 21, 2016 1:44 am

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby spg » Fri Oct 14, 2016 4:05 pm

Sometimewoodworker wrote:And you may have noticed that "spg" conveniently forgot to point out that AAC blocks do not absorb water very well at all. Throwing more doubt the claims made
image.png


It doesn't say that, it says 'the surface directly in contact with the water is affected'; 'moisture cannot continue pulling very deep into the material'. This is consistent, with the surface being wet, as I observed using my moisture meter. Perhaps the inside of the block is much drier, I don't have a probe for that.

It also states, but you have for some reason cropped it out:

" By the end of the autoclaving process, the AAC contains approximately 30% (by weight) water, which dissipates naturally over time to stabilize at a moisture content of 4% to 8%. "

[Elsewhere Hebel is typically quoted as 'wet' at 10%']

Hebel quote moisture values at several moisture contents - 30%, 10%, 5% and 4%.

They also suggest using a dehumidifier if building rapidly, in order to reduce the moisture content below 18%. Thus the process of stabilizing from a newly cooked block at 30% moisture to 10% and below takes some time, and this must depend on weather conditions. The amount of time is not defined, however given that the OUTSIDE of my some of my blocks are around 30% moisture, it is difficult to draw any conclusions about the moisture content of the inside, beyond that it is presumably lower than that, however perhaps still very wet. Although you could say that if the blocks when delivered were at, say, 15%, moisture, then they are unlikely to have risen above that in view of the quotes, and perhaps the moisture is really just skin deep.
spg
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat May 21, 2016 1:44 am

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby Roger Ramjet » Fri Oct 14, 2016 5:42 pm

spg wrote: Although you could say that if the blocks when delivered were at, say, 15%, moisture, then they are unlikely to have risen above that in view of the quotes, and perhaps the moisture is really just skin deep.

spg,
All I hear from you are reasons and data that change each time we question something. We live in Thailand, which is what this forum is for and if you go to any major building supplier (Thai Watsadu) you'll see thousands of AAC blocks sitting in the rain, hail or shine waiting to be sold. Hebel AAC or as I call them Superblock have been around for years in Europe, USA and Australia, but have just been discovered in Thailand and not one member has ever had the problems you claim to have had.
I'll say it again, your blocks do not look like the Superblock we get here and your photos show they haven't been rendered, which is what should have happened to them within a few days, unless you get a 3 month flood that stops your build.
For anyone who has used Superblock, they will look at all your remarks and say to themselves: Piffle. Which is what I'm doing.
User avatar
Roger Ramjet
 
Posts: 5250
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 12:55 pm

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Fri Oct 14, 2016 5:56 pm

spg wrote:
It doesn't say that, it says 'the surface directly in contact with the water is affected'; 'moisture cannot continue pulling very deep into the material'. This is consistent, with the surface being wet, as I observed using my moisture meter. Perhaps the inside of the block is much drier, I don't have a probe for that.



You don't need a probe, just a common wood saw or even a cutoff saw or angle grinder can be used, cut a block in half and check. It's not rocket science :)
image.jpeg


image.jpeg


image.jpeg


It also states, but you have for some reason cropped it out:


No I just didn't bother to include the part you had posted



They also suggest using a dehumidifier if building rapidly, in order to reduce the moisture content below 18%. Thus the process of stabilizing from a newly cooked block at 30% moisture to 10% and below takes some time, and this must depend on weather conditions. The amount of time is not defined, however given that the OUTSIDE of my some of my blocks are around 30% moisture, it is difficult to draw any conclusions about the moisture content of the inside,
well no, it is easy. As I've said just cut one in half, no problem

beyond that it is presumably lower than that, however perhaps still very wet. Although you could say that if the blocks when delivered were at, say, 15%, moisture, then they are unlikely to have risen above that in view of the quotes, and perhaps the moisture is really just skin deep.


You are unlikely to have freshly made blocks so it is very unlikely that the blocks are still very wet, but very easy to check.

The videos under are narrated in English so easy to understand

Short soaking

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KotndCJeps

image.png
5min submersion


6 hour soaking

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVutC28c7X8

image.png
6 hour total submersion
Sometimewoodworker
 
Posts: 1799
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:22 pm
Location: Non Sa-At / Tokyo

Re: Dry stacked block column

Postby Sofienetta » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:41 pm

Blocks need not be of any special design. They don't have to interlock, and best of all you don't have to know how to lay block. You simply stack the concrete blocks in a running bond pattern and then parge coat both sides with a single layer of fiber reinforced, surface bonding cement. Applied 1/8 inch thick minimum to both sides, surface bonding cements have strengths that are superior to conventionally mortared block walls and they look a lot better too without any grout lines.
Sofienetta
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:38 pm

Previous

Return to cement, concrete and mortar

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest