metal studs & Gypsum or Block walls?

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Re: metal studs & Gypsum or Block walls?

Postby BKKBILL » Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:18 pm

geordie wrote:
Makes sense but i beleive your winters are a bit more severe ?

Not so geordie lived on Vancouver Island the west coast where we would be lucky to get snow once in five years. A lot more like that crappie UK weather except we did have great summers.

The heat recovery units were as much or more so for the radon gas emissions.

This one from the EPA http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/mitstds.html

England & Wales Building regulations

In addition, for the first time Part F will require post-completion testing of ventilation equipment. Part F’s new Domestic Ventilation Installation and Commissioning Compliance Guide has been introduced to ensure that ventilation not only delivers the required airflow, but does it efficiently and quietly. The guide includes sign off procedures and paperwork completion to ensure performance and efficiency are met.

Surely the installation of coal and wood fired furnaces in the UK is starting to slow down.

http://www.vent-axia.com/legislation/bu ... egulations
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Re: metal studs & Gypsum or Block walls?

Postby geordie » Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:39 pm

BKKBILL wrote:
England & Wales Building regulations

In addition, for the first time Part F will require post-completion testing of ventilation equipment. Part F’s new Domestic Ventilation Installation and Commissioning Compliance Guide has been introduced to ensure that ventilation not only delivers the required airflow, but does it efficiently and quietly. The guide includes sign off procedures and paperwork completion to ensure performance and efficiency are met.

Surely the installation of coal and wood fired furnaces in the UK is starting to slow down.

http://www.vent-axia.com/legislation/bu ... egulations


Not sure i understand the cosequences but it seems vent axia are blowing their trumpet on how economically their fans can extract somewhere amongst it seems to be a heat exchanger option all very well but all costing in the long run power is required for these fans old school method for venting timber floors something you had to be careful of if you extended a property and installed a concrete slab that in effect blocked the air bricks placed to vent under your floors we installed two 6" pipes usually one would be installed to the centre of the house the other would just penitrate the wall this acted as a venturi it would somehow (not a scientist) create an imbalance one pipe would suck one would blow unbeleivable as it is it works and as far as i know is still the only practical way of venting wooden floors from beyond concrete allowing rearward sideward extensions it requires no fan ?? so is it not feasable to work the same priciples elswhere in the house the problem i see with fans creating ventilation what happens when it breaks ? a large percentage of the population will not bother to repair it untill i create,s other issues
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Re: metal studs & Gypsum or Block walls?

Postby BKKBILL » Wed Aug 29, 2012 10:57 pm

Was just to hi-light Part F Building Regulations Some fifty-five pages not to promote vent-axia as they all will claim to be the best.

http://www.drventilation.co.uk/pdf/buil ... _partF.pdf

I don’t see any sense of sealing and insulating a building just to make holes in it without recovering that already heated air.
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Re: metal studs & Gypsum or Block walls?

Postby chippy72 » Mon Jul 06, 2015 2:46 pm

I'm going back to udon in December and want to be getting on with my walls exterior and interior. I thought about stud and board but I thought it would be harder to find a tradesman to do this. So decided to go for thermolite blocks interior and exterior all with cavity the exterior for insulation and airflow purpose, interior for sound proof and ease of chasing out. Can any one point me in the right direction of a good , clean block layer (I don't want the cavity full of muck). And roughly how many blocks can a decent Thai lay in a day?? Any help much appreciated thanks
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Re: metal studs & Gypsum or Block walls?

Postby Roger Ramjet » Mon Jul 06, 2015 4:50 pm

chippy72 wrote:So decided to go for thermolite blocks interior and exterior all with cavity the exterior for insulation and airflow purpose, interior for sound proof and ease of chasing out.

I don't think you mean thermolite, that is a fabric. I think you are talking about AAC block or Superblock as some of us Aussies call them. They are the lightweight block with thermal properties.....they keep the heat out and the cool in.
If you are talking about AAC or Superblock there is no muck involved, they use glue and if they use anymore than the thickness of an 1/8th of an inch they have no idea how to use the glue. And if that is what you are talking about do not let them bullshit to you they have to lay a bed of cement first, it just means they are too lazy to cut a block in half when they get to the ceiling.
Unfortunately my cement render guy (who also layed the blocks) either lost his phone or someone stole it, so I can't call him. As far as how many blocks they will lay in a day that depends on the Thai involved, mine could do close on 4-500 without putting himself out at all, his wife would mix the glue while he layed the blocks, however, I think most Thais look at a wall after they finish and say to themselves "That's it for the day, now for a beer".
Just make sure they start with a flat base (normally your slab) and with AAC or Superblock you can see the slightest deviation.... and you'd better be quick in fixing it that glue sets in no time at all.
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