Workshop power...sub-board required or not?

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Re: Workshop power...sub-board required or not?

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Mon Jan 19, 2015 8:07 am

Since reading the thread above I've taken a look at ”Concrete Encased Electrode Grounding” and it seems an ideal system to use in Thailand.
Most buildings use renforced concrete.
Most renforced concrete doesn't have a vapour barrier between it and the soil.
In most buildings all or at least part of the renforced concrete is made on site so extending 1 piece into the house is easy.

If it causes ground loops then it's easy to disconect and then to use a normal ground and ground rod system.

It also seems to have answered RR's question about lightning protection as his whole house is grounded if the roof is connected to the rebar, I think it probably is.
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Re: Workshop power...sub-board required or not?

Postby Roger Ramjet » Mon Jan 19, 2015 8:31 am

Sometimewoodworker wrote:Read more about audio at: http://www.epanorama.net/documents/groundloop/

I guess you didn't read epanorama which states. NOTE: The information presented here is believed to be correct and is made available here by the author. The author of this document is not liable for any effect this information or any use thereof may have.

Read more at: http://www.epanorama.net/documents/groundloop/
Ground loop as that commercial site says it MAY effect high end equipment like hospital or audio equipment. There is nothing there that states it affects a workshop, nothing that states it affects a computer and audio equipment in a workshop and even I don't have that.
He further states: The bottom line is that a perfect "quiet" ground does not exist. The basics of all noise problems on the grounding system boils down to what is objectionable current. With the exception of hospital systems, the definition is vague at best. The standard electrical grounding system throughout the building isn't designed to have current constantly flowing through it--and yet it does, you cannot stop it. The reason a ground will not and never be perfectly noise free is that the grounding electrode conductor is nothing more than a long wire from point A to point B. And the longer the wire the more noise it will pick up.

Read more at: http://www.epanorama.net/documents/groundloop/
Which is why I suggested that link should not be posted..... but you still posted it.
He's not talking about workshop power and a sub-board, he's talking about high end electrical components that "hum" on a certain frequency 50 mhz.
That problem was solved years ago.
The original poster wanted to know what I had installed and why. I answered that question simply. I have three boards in three separate places and have grounded all of them in three separate places.
Everyone knows Thais love to cut corners and run just two wires without an earth, but that wasn't the question.
Sometimewoodworker wrote:There is also a system of connecting to the rebar inside the concrete and so using the entire structure of the house as an earth but I don't know enough to know what problems that has.

The reason people use the rebar to make a ground earth can be found here. http://www.psihq.com/iread/ufergrnd.htm
Sorry but your Wiki page is not a goer, it just points to other threads that have not been checked.
Sometimewoodworker wrote:It also seems to have answered RR's question about lightning protection as his whole house is grounded if the roof is connected to the rebar, I think it probably is.

It wasn't my question, firstly, it was stated by another poster in this thread and it's rubbish.
You are correct, I used the whole house as lightening protection by earthing the rebar as well. It's called a Faraday Cage http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage and I did it because I have a metal roof that sits higher than the surrounding buildings. Max and I (Max and Bee in Chaeng Mai) had a lengthy discussion about lightening strikes with all the latest information available posted on his thread. Max was worried about lightening striking his observatory or the surrounding water in the rice paddies. Both of us posted everything we could find that made sense in regards to lightening strikes, including how little the scientists really knew about where it was going to strike and why.
I'm trying to keep my answers simple without complications and adding stuff that confuses the original question.
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Re: Workshop power...sub-board required or not?

Postby Thaifelix » Fri Jan 30, 2015 7:36 am

Thanks everyone for your very helpful advice. Sorry for delay in responding but have very unreliable internet here as well as other building projects demanding my time. I have had a rethink on this and am considering running a separate line to the workshop direct from the power pole/meter because the meter is actually closer than the house. I would install a separate distribution board and earth rod in the workshop which would also give me coverage for any future add-ons such as a bore pump. This would also save a lot of digging as well as overcome the problem of trying to pull heavier cable through the existing conduit from the house. Can anyone see any problems/restrictions with running another line from the meter and would regulations require it to be the same size cable as that required for a residence (I forget...is it 16mm2)? Many thanks.
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Re: Workshop power...sub-board required or not?

Postby Thaifelix » Thu Feb 12, 2015 6:46 pm

MMmmmm?? Almost two weeks and no response. I guess everyone is waiting for someone else to respond so they can disagree and then there will be a flurry of argumentative posts along with one stating the codes call for 3 inch copper pipe as the only solution :wink:
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Re: Workshop power...sub-board required or not?

Postby BKKBILL » Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:16 pm

Thaifelix wrote:MMmmmm?? Almost two weeks and no response. I guess everyone is waiting for someone else to respond so they can disagree and then there will be a flurry of argumentative posts along with one stating the codes call for 3 inch copper pipe as the only solution :wink:


That or everyone agrees with your scheme, or the three inch copper thing. :mrgreen:
It's not who you know, it's whom you know.
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