Stranded Cables for house wiring

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Re: Stranded Cables for house wiring

Postby rigpig.sparky » Wed Jun 04, 2014 7:34 pm

Thanks for all your help Guys, I REALLY do appreciate it. First I want to apologize for the late reply,the last 2 days have been VERY hectic.

I ended up buying double insulated flexible cable (twin and earth, due to the time constraints), it was expensive, and over kill but I would rather go better than boarder line. Needless to say the Thai electrician just thought I was nuts!!

It was interesting that trying to obtain something I took for granted in my own country was (is) so difficult to obtain here. I always say the impossible things happen easily here but the simple things always seem to be impossible.

I think the cable is obtainable, but you need to allow a month for them to do a run manufacturing it. And I have no idea of the price.

This is my first experience at the front line of tring to build (renovate) here. I did expect issues but didn't realize how you can just hit a brick wall, I have always prided myself with being able to fix anything, however, welcome to Thailand I guess. I can't wait for the next issue hahaha !!

Thank you to everyone for your help,
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Re: Stranded Cables for house wiring

Postby schuimpge » Wed Jun 04, 2014 9:03 pm

Just wondering.. How does Stranded Cable go with Push-Fit connectors?
My house is all solid cables, the reason simply that I did not have that bit of safety knowledge before..
But I also realized that all my connectors, them being earthed power points or light switches, are all push and fit..
Doesn't work with stranded cable, so where is the middle ground here? I am sure, no sane electrician, not even in Australia, would go around with a soldering iron and tin all wires... ?
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Re: Stranded Cables for house wiring

Postby rigpig.sparky » Wed Jun 04, 2014 9:20 pm

GOOD question, glad to see someone is paying attention hahaha!!

The cables are normally stranded but a 1.5mm2 cable has 3 strands, and anything up to 6 or 10mm2 has 7 strands, so if the wire is twisted together properly it will insert easily with no problem. If you have 2 or more wires, you simply twist them all together before inserting them, as you should anyway. What most prople fail to think of (some electricians too) is that everytime you have more thn 1 wire behind a switch or plug, you are making a join,and the wire should be joined (twisted together) BEFORE you connect it to the switch or plug. This should be the same for solid cables to, but the outside diameter of solid conductors when twisted are never as round and the diameter is thicker even when using the same size cables, so it is slightly more difficult.

Now if you are using a flexible cord as I have had to do (I am not using switches or plugs with that type of connection) and you needed to insert them the correct method would be to do as they do on proper commercial switch boards and use a "boot lace crimp" on the end of the wire or wires.

Hope that helps,

Tony

PS the difference between proper "electrical pliers" and "engineers pliers" is the knurl on the jaws. Electricians pliers have the knurl running diagonally across so that when you twist wires together they "lay in" correctly. Enginneer's pliers have the knurl running across (at right angles) across the jaw to help grip. Just because pliers are rated at 10000 volts does not make them "electrical pliers", car coils are 30,000 volts, for example.
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Re: Stranded Cables for house wiring

Postby MGV12 » Wed Jun 04, 2014 10:14 pm

rigpig.sparky wrote:GOOD question, glad to see someone is paying attention hahaha!!

The cables are normally stranded but a 1.5mm2 cable has 3 strands, and anything up to 6 or 10mm2 has 7 strands, so if the wire is twisted together properly it will insert easily with no problem. If you have 2 or more wires, you simply twist them all together before inserting them, as you should anyway. What most prople fail to think of (some electricians too) is that everytime you have more thn 1 wire behind a switch or plug, you are making a join,and the wire should be joined (twisted together) BEFORE you connect it to the switch or plug. This should be the same for solid cables to, but the outside diameter of solid conductors when twisted are never as round and the diameter is thicker even when using the same size cables, so it is slightly more difficult.

Now if you are using a flexible cord as I have had to do (I am not using switches or plugs with that type of connection) and you needed to insert them the correct method would be to do as they do on proper commercial switch boards and use a "boot lace crimp" on the end of the wire or wires.

Hope that helps,

Tony

PS the difference between proper "electrical pliers" and "engineers pliers" is the knurl on the jaws. Electricians pliers have the knurl running diagonally across so that when you twist wires together they "lay in" correctly. Enginneer's pliers have the knurl running across (at right angles) across the jaw to help grip. Just because pliers are rated at 10000 volts does not make them "electrical pliers", car coils are 30,000 volts, for example.


Very informative post ... thanks

“Some days I am an optimistic pessimist ... other days I am a pessimistic optimist”
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Re: Stranded Cables for house wiring

Postby schuimpge » Thu Jun 05, 2014 6:03 am

MGV12 wrote:
rigpig.sparky wrote:GOOD question, glad to see someone is paying attention hahaha!!

The cables are normally stranded but a 1.5mm2 cable has 3 strands, and anything up to 6 or 10mm2 has 7 strands, so if the wire is twisted together properly it will insert easily with no problem. If you have 2 or more wires, you simply twist them all together before inserting them, as you should anyway. What most prople fail to think of (some electricians too) is that everytime you have more thn 1 wire behind a switch or plug, you are making a join,and the wire should be joined (twisted together) BEFORE you connect it to the switch or plug. This should be the same for solid cables to, but the outside diameter of solid conductors when twisted are never as round and the diameter is thicker even when using the same size cables, so it is slightly more difficult.

Now if you are using a flexible cord as I have had to do (I am not using switches or plugs with that type of connection) and you needed to insert them the correct method would be to do as they do on proper commercial switch boards and use a "boot lace crimp" on the end of the wire or wires.

Hope that helps,

Tony

PS the difference between proper "electrical pliers" and "engineers pliers" is the knurl on the jaws. Electricians pliers have the knurl running diagonally across so that when you twist wires together they "lay in" correctly. Enginneer's pliers have the knurl running across (at right angles) across the jaw to help grip. Just because pliers are rated at 10000 volts does not make them "electrical pliers", car coils are 30,000 volts, for example.


Very informative post ... thanks


Yes indeed, thanks..
Luc
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Re: Stranded Cables for house wiring

Postby Jack&Amy » Sun Jul 20, 2014 5:27 pm

You might be wanting/looking for VSF cable? It is multi stranded and used mainly for control wiring...It is rated at 300Volts as is the Thai version of twin & earth.......Thai electricians like to use THW, a solid drawn copper cable that they join as and when they feel like it, THW it is rated at 750Volts....

Nation manufacture VSF cable...

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