Electrical and services wire channel system

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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Davidxxx » Tue Sep 29, 2015 7:05 pm

I would appreciate answers to two queries:
1. Can someone explain why electrical conduit is needed in a roof space in Thailand. I have had many houses in the UK and never had problems with normal wiring.
2. Surely it is better practice to loop power in and out of sockets rather than drop single cables down the walls using choc boxes with the numerous screwed connections they require. This also means any problems can be sorted at the socket location rather than going into the roof space. Straight through junction boxes (where the cable is not cut) are available in the UK but I have not seen them in Thailand.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:38 pm

Davidxxx wrote:I would appreciate answers to two queries:
1. Can someone explain why electrical conduit is needed in a roof space in Thailand. I have had many houses in the UK and never had problems with normal wiring.
2. Surely it is better practice to loop power in and out of sockets rather than drop single cables down the walls using choc boxes with the numerous screwed connections they require. This also means any problems can be sorted at the socket location rather than going into the roof space. Straight through junction boxes (where the cable is not cut) are available in the UK but I have not seen them in Thailand.

1: It isn't if you don't mind beasties chewing on the cable :)
2: It looks as if you're talking about ring mains, which are a UK phenomenon, however if not there is nothing to stop you putting in a junction box and pulling cable through without cutting it. So I fail to understand your point.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Roger Ramjet » Tue Sep 29, 2015 10:54 pm

Davidxxx wrote:2. Surely it is better practice to loop power in and out of sockets rather than drop single cables down the walls using choc boxes with the numerous screwed connections they require. This also means any problems can be sorted at the socket location rather than going into the roof space. Straight through junction boxes (where the cable is not cut) are available in the UK but I have not seen them in Thailand.

If at any time you need to increase the load on the wiring, it's a simple thing to attach and pull through heavier cable to the mains box. I have over 14 different outlets in the computer room one of which runs a 4,000 watt gaming computer, to link them through straight through junction boxes would cause a massive overload on the one system.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby canopy » Wed Sep 30, 2015 7:07 am

Roger Ramjet wrote:runs a 4,000 watt gaming computer


I can't imagine what is taking all that power so curious what your specs are. Even a 500 watt PSU can handle extremely powerful graphics cards in sli/crossfire.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Roger Ramjet » Wed Sep 30, 2015 9:47 am

canopy wrote:I can't imagine what is taking all that power so curious what your specs are. Even a 500 watt PSU can handle extremely powerful graphics cards in sli/crossfire.

It's an Acer Aspire with 16 MB of Ram (12 added), a terabyte C Drive and a 750 GB on D drive with a GeForce GTX 590 .... it is less than 12 months old. I use it for serious games like Dragon Age and other strategy games Medieval Total War, The Settlers, Elemental and Crusader Extreme..... I am a member of a number of gaming servers..... Origin (AE Games) being the main one
My previous gaming computer a G View ran at 3,000 watts and had an NVida card that was slow.
I take it the maximum wattage is only used at start-up or in extreme circumstances. I do beta testing for AE Games. The set-up is ranked in the top 17% by Origin.
I'm just going by what is written on the computer when I quote the 4,000 watts, but I had one socket wired in to take the watts anyway. I'm running windows 7.2 (legal version).
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Sep 30, 2015 10:19 am

Roger Ramjet wrote:
canopy wrote:I can't imagine what is taking all that power so curious what your specs are. Even a 500 watt PSU can handle extremely powerful graphics cards in sli/crossfire.

It's an Acer Aspire with 16 MB of Ram (12 added), a terabyte C Drive and a 750 GB on D drive with a GeForce GTX 590 .... it is less than 12 months old. I use it for serious games like Dragon Age and other strategy games Medieval Total War, The Settlers, Elemental and Crusader Extreme..... I am a member of a number of gaming servers..... Origin (AE Games) being the main one
My previous gaming computer a G View ran at 3,000 watts and had an NVida card that was slow.
I take it the maximum wattage is only used at start-up or in extreme circumstances. I do beta testing for AE Games. The set-up is ranked in the top 17% by Origin.
I'm just going by what is written on the computer when I quote the 4,000 watts, but I had one socket wired in to take the watts anyway. I'm running windows 7.2 (legal version).


Standard 2.5mm cable Can have a 33meter run to the main box and will give a safe load of 24 amps or 5,760 watts though most standard plugs and sockets don't go over 16amps which is about the quoted power draw of your computer.

So a dedicatied circuit 2.5mm can safely serve the computer and all its accessories.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby pattayapope » Wed Sep 30, 2015 2:25 pm

Davidxxx wrote:1. Can someone explain why electrical conduit is needed in a roof space in Thailand. I have had many houses in the UK and never had problems with normal wiring.2. Surely it is better practice to loop power in and out of sockets rather than drop single cables down the walls using choc boxes with the numerous screwed connections they require. This also means any problems can be sorted at the socket location rather than going into the roof space. Straight through junction boxes (where the cable is not cut) are available in the UK but I have not seen them in Thailand.


Question 1

As stated better protection against insects and small animals eating the insulation, but many places don't use conduit here in Thailand except in the walls, only the better installations use conduit in the open areas, in UK they use double insulated cables which gives more mechanical protection than the single wires used on Asia. Nothing to stop you using twin and earth but need some conduit in the wall to run the cables.

Question 2

As STWW says seems exclusive to UK wiring systems, I used a ring main system on my house wiring and have three circuits in the main house but the other buildings have spares run down from the ceiling to each socket. Again you can use if you want as has more advantages over the Thai standard wiring. For power wiring you should not use less the 2.5 M2 wires for sockets and larger for heaters and big AC units. Straight thru junction boxes are widely available here and it is more difficult to find any with terminals installed inside.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Wed Sep 30, 2015 5:52 pm

pattayapope wrote:
Davidxxx wrote:1. Can someone explain why electrical conduit is needed in a roof space in Thailand. I have had many houses in the UK and never had problems with normal wiring.2. Surely it is better practice to loop power in and out of sockets rather than drop single cables down the walls using choc boxes with the numerous screwed connections they require. This also means any problems can be sorted at the socket location rather than going into the roof space. Straight through junction boxes (where the cable is not cut) are available in the UK but I have not seen them in Thailand.


Question 1

As stated better protection against insects and small animals eating the insulation, but many places don't use conduit here in Thailand except in the walls, only the better installations use conduit in the open areas, in UK they use double insulated cables which gives more mechanical protection than the single wires used on Asia. Nothing to stop you using twin and earth but need some conduit in the wall to run the cables.

Question 2

As STWW says seems exclusive to UK wiring systems, I used a ring main system on my house wiring and have three circuits in the main house but the other buildings have spares run down from the ceiling to each socket. Again you can use if you want as has more advantages over the Thai standard wiring. For power wiring you should not use less the 2.5 M2 wires for sockets and larger for heaters and big AC units. Straight thru junction boxes are widely available here and it is more difficult to find any with terminals installed inside.


If you are going to run in trunking or conduits then you really want to use single insulated wire rather than twin and earth specially if you are running 4mm or more for high load circuits or you are doing long runs of 2.5. The reason is easy to understand if you try to pull the cable yourself.

If you are surface mounting then twin and earth is the only way to go.

Just for interest if you run in trunking, under insulation or in the wall your circuit has a lower power rating than if you surface mount.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Davidxxx » Thu Oct 01, 2015 8:37 am

Thanks for the answers which are very helpful. So I am just left with some detail queries but "the devils in the detail"

1. Conduit down walls - why ? - UK does not require it, in UK just plaster over but ensure cable runs are vertical or horizontal from fittings. Everything will be RCD protected.

2. If I have to use conduit down the walls the local building blocks are only 6cm thick so the channelling would break through one side of the block. Is this the norm.

For information my background is aircraft avionics, so a) I follow the rules and standards (but am not used to no standards), b) I understand the theory but am not used to using "crap" fittings which are not designed for the job.

I plan to us an "electrician" type friend of the gf to run the cables or conduits to my instructions and I will do all the connections.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Sometimewoodworker » Thu Oct 01, 2015 8:53 am

Davidxxx wrote:Thanks for the answers which are very helpful. So I am just left with some detail queries but "the devils in the detail"

1. Conduit down walls - why ? - UK does not require it, in UK just plaster over but ensure cable runs are vertical or horizontal from fittings. Everything will be RCD protected.

Think about how to replace the cable if needed. Also cable in conduit has a higher rating than embedded cable.
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Re: Electrical and services wire channel system

Postby Shastadad » Fri Oct 09, 2015 8:01 am

You will go a long way by getting out of the UK mindset

What they do there has nothing to do with how things are done here in Thailand

If you want to duplicate the UK experience got right ahead, just hope you have a lot of patience and excellent Thai language skills since you are going to need both trying to deal with a Thai sparky

If you think that they have strange ways of treating electricity, just wait till you start dealing with Thai plumbing
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