Led Lighting

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Re: Led Lighting

Postby Berry Papay » Mon May 21, 2012 4:36 pm

The wholesaler I used had to be 'persuaded' to obtain the LED's I wanted [all they had in stock were the colour-changing variety] but didn't have the foggiest notion about drivers apart from insisting "Halogen driver OK" .... not if you want a non-flickering light and long life it isn't!



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Re: Led Lighting

Postby fredlk » Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:13 pm

These are the lamps I bought:
IMG_4150.JPG

All are in the same type of enclosed fitting and they don't generate heat. Half of one lamp is facing upwards and completely exposed to rain and all weathers, the one on the buttress:
IMG_5172.JPG

Twice now the lamp in there has lost half of its leds like such:
IMG_5839.JPG

I thought it was a failure when it happened a couple of weeks ago, but after replacing it with a new one, it too lost half its leds after a couple of weeks and after some heavy rain.
I've read about heat causing led failure but there is no heat unless of course this does happen while it's raining. The units are all well sealed and rain cannot get in.

Does anybody have an idea what might cause only half of a lamp to fail and both times in the same (exposed) fitting of the 55 that are in place?
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby sirineou » Thu Jul 19, 2012 4:27 pm

This is strange,
It only happens on that one light , and on only in half of the LED?
Could it be a coincidence, and that the first LED was defective, but was replaced with a second defective LED?
to eliminate that possibility , I would take an LED from an other area where it has being working for a while and has not failed, and installed in the area where you had the failure. If it also fails, then you know that it is either the location, or the light fixture.
If it is the location then could it be that, it is not the rain that is getting in the LED that is causing the failure, but the sudden cooling of a hot LED by a cool rain.? much like putting cold water in a hot glass . and the half that is failing is the half that is more exposed?
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby fredlk » Thu Jul 19, 2012 4:46 pm

sirineou wrote:Could it be a coincidence, and that the first LED was defective, but was replaced with a second defective LED?

No they both worked fine for a while and both were new when first used.
sirineou wrote: then you know that it is either the location, or the light fixture.

It is the location and the light fixture, but why?
sirineou wrote: the sudden cooling of a hot LED by a cool rain.?

That might be it.
sirineou wrote:and the half that is failing is the half that is more exposed?

More exposed to what? It failed half to the right of the buttress and the half to the left still worked this last time. Both left and right are similarly exposed.

Why do half the leds in the lamp fail in this light fitting? What does rain have to do with it if the lamp is not getting wet or even moist?
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby sirineou » Thu Jul 19, 2012 5:48 pm

fredlk wrote:
sirineou wrote:Could it be a coincidence, and that the first LED was defective, but was replaced with a second defective LED?

No they both worked fine for a while and both were new when first used.
sirineou wrote: then you know that it is either the location, or the light fixture.

It is the location and the light fixture, but why?
sirineou wrote: the sudden cooling of a hot LED by a cool rain.?

That might be it.
sirineou wrote:and the half that is failing is the half that is more exposed?

More exposed to what? It failed half to the right of the buttress and the half to the left still worked this last time. Both left and right are similarly exposed.

Why do half the leds in the lamp fail in this light fitting? What does rain have to do with it if the lamp is not getting wet or even moist?

Sorry Fredlk, I don't have any answers, I only have more questions, hopefully these questions might help get an answer.
It is my thinking that all the individual LEDs are internally connected by circuit, and either the individual LEDs or part of the circuit is failing, now the question is why, and why only on that location.Since it has only happen twice it is possible that it is a coincidence, but since it has happened on only half of the LEDs and on the same side, (is it on the same side?) then I would think an unlikely coincidence.But it does not hurt to check it out.
Excluding coincidence, and since it is not happening anywhere else, we are left with two causes (in my mind, maybe there are others I have not think of)
one is the fixture, maybe there is something wrong in the wiring that causes the voltage to fluctuate, are there electronics in the fixture to assist the LED that could be faulty?
If we eliminate all of the above then we are only left with the only other variable involved and that is the environment.
How does the environment affect this particular unit? Difficult for me to say since I am not there. so I can only speculate.
It could be moisture shorting out part of the circuit, but since the unit is sealed it is unlikely.
can you brake open the first LED that failed and look inside? perhaps there will be some visual indication of condensation, or other damage.
I know that abrupt differences in temperature, can have an adverse affect on circuits, and material. That's what led to my rain hypothesis.
I know I am not helping a lot, but maybe you have not thought of some of the questions I am asking, and they might lead you on a different direction that might provide you with an answer.
I am curious to find out what is causing it also, good luck.
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby fredlk » Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:39 pm

sirineou wrote:one is the fixture, maybe there is something wrong in the wiring that causes the voltage to fluctuate

I've tried the faulty leds in other fixtures and it's the same.
sirineou wrote: can you brake open the first LED that failed and look inside? perhaps there will be some visual indication of condensation, or other damage.

Come to think of it, after the first failure I did press on its casing while on and it briefly came on again which points to a circuit problem.
sirineou wrote: can you brake open the first LED that failed and look inside?

I'll do that the next time my electrical-expert-friend visits because all I will see is stuff while he might see loose connections. :D
Thanks for the suggestions.
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby MGV12 » Thu Jul 19, 2012 7:08 pm

In the meantime Fred ... try buying a different brand of lamp and see if you get the same problem. The type that the likes of you and I buy here [whether the box has a brand name or not they don't tend to have manufacturers details] are very much at the lower end of the market and therefore not necessarily state of the art. I won't bore/confuse you with the techy blurb but the way they are manufactured is much below that of the premium brands and with consequent shortcomings. I have one high up in the eaves that has been flickering for months ... whereas all the others are stable ... why? Certainly best to also get your electrician to see if there is a connection issue but if a different brand does the job ... result! I find that the SMD type [the ones without all the little nodes] are more stable and reliable.

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Re: Led Lighting

Postby sjeng » Thu Jul 19, 2012 8:55 pm

check out the L and the N wire in the fitting are they all connected in the same way. it might help and when you turn the lamp 180 degree does the same half burn~!!!
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby fredlk » Thu Jul 19, 2012 8:59 pm

MGV12 wrote:I find that the SMD type [the ones without all the little nodes] are more stable and reliable.

Possibly but the heat they generate is more and that's why I went with these. I don't think it's a quality issue as such because the other 53 are all working perfectly. That's why I think lamp/place/weather has something to do with it. Anyway I couldn't have fitted any other lamp in these sealed fittings because the heat would be too much and much of the glass would have disintegrated by now. I am overall very happy with them and just trying to understand the technology a little better.
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby fredlk » Fri Aug 10, 2012 12:45 pm

A friend suggests that a brownout caused the failure as he dimmed similar leds and they failed in the same way.
Another possibility is heat which causes leds to fail and this lamp is the only one in the direct sunlight all day every day.
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby MGV12 » Sun Aug 26, 2012 7:42 am

Not likely to be seen at a store near you any time soon ... but apparently the next step in LED lighting.

The First Liquid-Cooled LED Bulb Will Light Up Your House Like Edison


366750464.225596.jpg
60-Watt Equivalent The liquid silicone-filled bulb can stay much cooler than other LED light bulbs, which helps it emit a more pleasant, incandescent-like warm light. SWITCH

The ice cream cone-shaped fluorescent light bulb was supposed to be the lamp of the future, producing just as much light as the century-old Edison incandescent at a fraction of the energy. But CFLs look terrible, enveloping rooms in an unfriendly bluish hue. LED lamps are the next future of lighting, but they have their own obstacles to overcome, including sensitive electronics that can burn out when they get warm. SWITCH, the first liquid-cooled light bulb, aims to solve that issue and light up your house with the comfortable yellow glow of the incandescent.

WHAT'S NEW

Right out of the box, the SWITCH60 feels impressive, like a Cadillac version of a regular bulb. It has the globed shape of the 60-watts I used to buy before switching to CFLs, but it's way, way heavier -- the weight is the first indication that it's a piece of technology, not just a thin piece of glass you screw into a lamp and forget. On my kitchen scale, it weighed in at 9.8 ounces, about as much as a typical volleyball.

The weight is behind this bulb's secret -- it's full of liquid silicone, which dissipates heat from the 10 LEDs (12 LEDs for the 100-watt version). Warmer silicone moves toward the glass exterior, where heat dissipates into the air; as it cools, the silicone drops back toward the bulb's heart. Think of a lava lamp; this works basically the same way, said Dave Horn, chief technology officer at SWITCH. You just can't see the gloopy circulation.

The bulb also contains a volume-compensation device that works somewhat like a piston to keep the bulb at atmospheric pressure. If the bulb breaks, it won't explode. Plus, liquid silicone is food-safe and clear, so if you drop one and it breaks, your carpet won't stain and your dog won't get sick. This is a benefit over the mercury vapor-filled CFL, which can emit harmful mercury if it shatters.

WHAT'S GOOD

I replaced a CFL with the SWITCH60 in an upright light fixture in a room with white walls and a white ceiling, and the room filled with a comforting yellowish glow, which I thought was distinctly different from the cool blue hue of the one it replaced. Another major benefit: It was 100 percent bright immediately. No waiting for the vapors to fully warm up and fluoresce, which is one of the more annoying aspects of a CFL.

Other LED lamps emit light around 3,000 degrees Kelvin, a measure of color temperature, which is more toward the bluish end of the spectrum. It turns out that more energy is required to get to 2,700 K, around the color temperature of an incandescent bulb. SWITCH bulbs can take the heat this extra electricity generates, Horn said.

This is because of the phosphor blend used to produce that color, he said. "To get that redder look, the phosphor peak is very wide. Some of that red pulls into the infrared, and that’s why the efficiency drops." The bulbs use a bit more power than others on the market, but the team decided it was worth it to achieve the proper glow. The 60-watt equivalent uses 12 watts, while the 100-watt equivalent uses 21 watts.

WHAT'S BAD

The price tag. The 60-watt version will set you back $40, and the brighter ones go for $60. The weight may also be troubling to some. It would feel weird in a cheaper lamp with a clamp-on shade, like you'd be injuring it. Horn said the weight is a common question and is "duly noted." "In the next generation lamps, we're looking at reducing that weight tremendously," he said. The bulbs aren't on sale yet, but they were shipped earlier this month to hotels and other hospitality establishments, so you may start seeing them soon.

THE VERDICT

If you miss the sun-like glow of the old Edison bulbs and care about energy savings -- and price is not an issue -- then this bulb is for you. It works well, looks great and does exactly as advertised. Compared to other LED options, the SWITCH bulb may be a better investment, because the liquid coolant will help direct heat away from the drivers, prolonging their life. It'll pay for itself, eventually; SWITCH says with 80 percent energy savings, that'll happen at around six months. But at the end of the day, it's worth more than many of the light fixtures into which it will be screwed--and whether it's worth it will vary by person.

http://www.popsci.com/technology/articl ... use-edison

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Re: Led Lighting

Postby MGV12 » Sun Aug 26, 2012 7:54 am

Again unlikely to be available in LOS until they have done promoting CFL's ... but the race to produce LED's that overcome the "insufficient light" citiscism is [not] hotting up. My question would be 'do we really need 100W bulbs ... or is it just that we are used to them?' Personally I prefer a number of lower wattage bulbs to give a range of room lighting.

Osram Sylvania's 100 W-equivalent LED bulb may be pick of the bunch

May 11, 2012

osram-sylvania-ultra.jpg
Osram Sylvania has been in touch to tell us about its 100 W-replacement LED light bulb, joining its Sylvania Ultra series: a 20 W, 1600 lumen light bulb with a a warm color appearance of 2700 K - the most compelling spec we've seen

Following Gizmag's coverage of GE Lighting's 27 W Energy Smart and Switch Lighting's 100 W-replacement LED light bulbs, Osram Sylvania has been in touch to tell us about its 100 W-replacement LED light bulb, joining its Sylvania Ultra series: a 20 W, 1600 lumen light bulb with a warm, "incandescenty" color appearance of 2700 K. With Philips also to release a 100-W equivalent this means the big three manufacturers of light sources are joining Switch Lighting in offering high-output LED light bulbs for the home, but all things considered, Osram Sylvania's may prove the pick of the bunch.

Though the press release provided to us puts the Ultra's efficacy at 89 lm/W, the math suggests a 1600-lm light source running at 20 W has a slightly lower efficacy of 80 lm/W. Even so, that's right up there with Switch Lighting's latest figures (also 80 lm/W), and superior to GE's (60 lm/W).

The 20-W Ultra fares just as well on color appearance, out-warming both GE's (2870 K) and Switch's (4100 K) offerings with a remarkably toasty color of 2700 K. There's a fuller explanation of color appearance in our report on GE's announcement (linked above), but the upshot is that warmer colors, indicated by lower Kelvin values, tend to be preferable for home use.

We understand Philips is also to put a 100 W-replacement LED light bulb onto the market. Though we've yet to see word directly from source, industry insiders corroborate press coverage that Philips' 23-W AmbientLED emits an impressive 1700 lm, for an efficacy of 74 lm/W - very good for home light sources, but mid-table in respect of the direct competition of 100 W-replacement LED light bulbs. We have not yet seen color appearance figures for Philips' AmbientLED.

Like the competition, Osram Sylvania claims its LED light bulb boasts omni-directional output, though none of the manufacturers has produced data to quantify this to our knowledge (which it is possible to do).

On paper at least, Osram Sylvania's Ultra appears to have the strongest specification, matching or exceeding the best-performing competition in terms of efficacy and color appearance, (even if Philips' light bulb will emit the most light of all). But with prices for most of these light bulbs yet to be announced, the complete picture remains very far from clear.

We understand Osram Sylvania's 20 W Ultra should hit shelves between June and September this year.

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Re: Led Lighting

Postby MGV12 » Sun Aug 26, 2012 8:02 am

And finally:

Introducing the $60 Light Bulb

inventions_lightbulb.jpg
inventions_lightbulb.jpg (4.53 KiB) Viewed 948 times
The Philips LED light bulb. It's expensive.

The Associated Press reports that the Phillips LED light bulb that won the government’s L Prize—a $10 million contest to replace the traditional incandescent bulb—will go on sale as of Earth Day with a full retail price of $60. Yes, that’s $60 per bulb, not $60 for an entire house full of bulbs.

Phillips is discounting the price for bulbs purchased online to $50 apiece, but still, that sounds like a lot for a single stinking light bulb. The average U.S. home uses 45 light bulbs, so replacing all of them would run $2,250. Yikes.

In a Washington Post story published in March, one home-improvement center staffer offered these insights on the hot new Phillips bulb:

“I don’t want to say it’s exorbitant, but if a customer is only looking at the price, they could come to that conclusion,” said Brad Paulsen, merchant for the light-bulb category at Home Depot, the largest U.S. seller of light bulbs. “This is a Cadillac product, and that’s why you have a premium on it.”

As far as I know, the mainstream public hasn’t been clamoring for a “premium” light bulb. In fact, the push for more energy-efficient bulbs has brought about “light bulb anxiety” as some people have resorted to hoarding traditional bulbs before they’re removed from the marketplace for good. Consumers can be convinced by marketers that they want all sorts of premium products, but the “Cadillac of light bulbs”? That seems like a stretch, especially if it costs $50 or $60.

Nonetheless, a crunching of the numbers shows that you can pay 50 times more for bulbs upfront and still easily wind up saving a ton of money in the long run. An infographic accompanying the main WaPo story revealed that over a 10-year span, using traditional bulbs would cost $228 (for bulbs and energy). Screw in a Phillips bulb, though, and you’d pay a total of just $83 for energy and the bulb—a bulb that, mind you, would be less than halfway through its projected lifespan.

The math is even more in favor of the Phillips bulb when you factor in the incentives and deals the manufacturer is negotiating with utilities, which are expected to bring the price down by $20 or $30.

Let’s hope that Phillips’ new bulb performs better than some of the previous LED lights that have gone on sale to the public. LED bulbs are supposed to be functional for 20 years or more, but it’s problematic to actually conduct a 20-year test before bringing the product to the marketplace. To do a 20-year test, it’s helpful to have 20 actual years handy. That sort of timeline doesn’t work in this case. The Phillips bulb won the government competition after “18 months of intensive field, lab, and product testing to meet the rigorous requirements of the L Prize competition,” according to the Department of Energy. While “rigorous,” the testing was 18 and a half years shy of two decades.

Consumer groups are sure to keep a close eye on the new Phillips bulb to see if they provide good light for as long as the manufacturers and the government claims. Last summer, Consumer Reports released the results of its own tests on various other LED light bulbs, and some went dead before hitting the 3,000-hour mark, well short of the 25,000 hours they’re supposed to survive.

http://moneyland.time.com/2012/04/18/in ... ight-bulb/

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Re: Led Lighting

Postby fredlk » Sun Apr 28, 2013 9:59 am

Almost 2 years on from installing my many many led lamps and even though about 10 are on all night every night, there has not been one single failure (apart from the 2 halves mentioned here earlier).
I think they're great and if and when I need more lamps I'll be buying the exact same type.
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Re: Led Lighting

Postby MGV12 » Sun Apr 28, 2013 10:12 am

fredlk wrote:Almost 2 years on from installing my many many led lamps and even though about 10 are on all night every night, there has not been one single failure (apart from the 2 halves mentioned here earlier).
I think they're great and if and when I need more lamps I'll be buying the exact same type.


Good news ... but do check to see if any 'new generation' bulbs are available at an affordable price as evolution never stops.

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